Posts Tagged ‘project-management’

I was recently working on a project where we had about half a dozen developers working on an established code base. All of the developers were new to the code base and I knew that we were going to be making a fair number of database schema and data-seeding changes in a short period of time. Each developer had their own development environment with a dedicated database (PostgreSQL). The developers on the project had their hands full learning about the code base and I didn’t want to distract them by having to take a lot of their time managing their development database instances.

I decided to try using Alembic to manage the database schema migrations.
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Last year I attended and wrote about FOSS4G 2011 in Denver. The 2012 FOSS4G event was supposed to take place in Beijing this September. Last month OSGEO announced that the conference was cancelled.
Cameron Shorter has posted a detailed analysis on how the conference fell apart. His post does a great job of looking at the sequence of events that lead up to the current situation.

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CN Freight Train
Software infrastructure is a lot like municipal infrastructure such as highways, subways, and stadiums. Everyone likes to enjoy the benefits but we seem to have difficulties on when to build it, what to build, or how to pay for it.

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One of the least favourite parts of my job as a software developer is when the project manager comes to me with printout of a project plan done in Microsoft project and asks asks if the plan is okay.

The project plan printout shows a list of tasks, described by a 3-6 word title, along with start and end dates for each task. I am usually asked to look through this and figure out if a) The tasks are taking place in the right order, b) If any tasks are taking place at the same time that shouldn’t be (maybe because they require the same computers, components or people) and if the task estimates sound reasonable.

Making sense of a 100-500 task project plan from this type of list is pretty difficult. It would be much easier to view this as an interactive calendar that lets you view the tasks taking place in a given month, week or day. The other day I found a blog post by Ashish Paliwal on some software to convert a Microsoft Project .MPP file to Google Calendar.

I downloaded the software and spent the morning adding features to it, including

  • Task constraints, dependencies and resources now show up in the event description
  • Events on the calendar run from the start to end date
  • An option to skip tasks that have already completed

The 500+ item project plan I’ve been staring at is now much clearer.
My modified version of the tool is available at github. You can download an executable JAR with my changes from my sourceforge site

To convert a MS-Project .mpp to a Google Calendar just run

java -jar mpp.jar MyProjectPlan.mpp myemail@google.com

Then select one of the calendars from the list and the tool will update it to include the tasks from your project plan.