Posts Tagged ‘python’

I found the documentation on urllib2 a bit unclear about how to get cookie handling working properly.

I was working on a python script that needed to contact the OpenStreetMap web server, login with my OSM credentials and interact with the website.

The first step is to setup a urllib2 opener instance that is configured to store cookies.

import cookielib,Cookie,urllib2,urllib
import xml.etree.cElementTree as ElementTree

cookies = cookielib.CookieJar()
opener = urllib2.build_opener(urllib2.HTTPCookieProcessor(cookies))

This will create an opener that can be used to retrieve URL’s. Any cookies set in the HTTP response will be stored in the cookie’s cookie jar. If I needed to add additional openers (ie for special redirect handling) I would just add them as additional parameters to the build_opener call. ie urllib2.build_opener(handler1, handler2,handler3)…

Next we need to contact OpenStreetMap to get a blank login form. The blank login screen has a hidden variable ‘authenticity_token’ that needs to be passed back as part of the POST with my login credentials

inptag = '{http://www.w3.org/1999/xhtml}input'
formtag = '{http://www.w3.org/1999/xhtml}form'
# fetch the blank login form
response_tokenfetch = opener.open(request)
html = response_tokenfetch.read()
htmlfile=StringIO.StringIO(html)
# parse the HTML elements in the form
# extract any input fields for later resubmission
# this will pick up the authenticity_token and anything else
xml_tree = ElementTree.parse(htmlfile)
for form in xml_tree.getiterator(formtag):                
    for field in form.getiterator(inptag):
        if 'name' in field.attrib and 'value' in field.attrib:
                login_payload[field.attrib['name']] = field.attrib['value']
login_payload['username'] = username
login_payload['password'] = password
login_payload['remember_me'] = 'yes'
login_payload['cookie_test'] = 'true'

Next we submit the LOGIN request as a POST. Any session cookies returned as part of the blank form will be added to the second request.

cookies.add_cookie_header(request)
response = opener.open(request,urllib.urlencode(login_payload))

If our login was successful then cookies contains an _osm_session and _osm_username that will be used in subsequent API calls.

request2=urllib2.Request('http://api06.dev.openstreetmap.org/user/stevens/inbox)
cookies.add_cookie_header(request2)
response2 = opener.open(request2)
html=response2.read()

You could then parse the HTML to extract a list of messages.
If your using the formal OpenStreetMap API (ie calls under /api/0.6/…) then you should instead use oauth for authentication instead of logging in through the website. Some OSM features such as messaging can only be accessed by pretending to be a web session and parsing/faking HTML.

I spent the weekend attending Pycon Canada where I gave a talk on Pl/Python. I want to thank the conference organizers for putting on an excellent conference. I am told that this was the first time Pycon had a regional conference in Canada and that it was put together by a group of volunteers in less than 6 months.

One of my favourite parts of local/regional conferences held on weekends is that they tend to attract attendees who are passionate about computers and technology. The people who I spoke with at the conference were there because they wanted to be there,not because there boss wanted them to be there, and either loved Python or wanted to learn more about it. I’ve attended many great PostgreSQL conferences over the past few years but it was nice to spend sometime talking with people from broader development backgrounds.

In my discussions with people at the conference I noticed a trend. People I spoke with who are working at companies that did Python development tended to be using PostgreSQL. The ones that weren’t currently using PostgreSQL were using MySQL and talking about moving to PostgreSQL or were apologetic for still being on MySQL. The MySQL users were often apologizing before I told them that I was a PostgreSQL contributor. Some of the MySQL users also mentioned that they were using non-Oracle forks like Percona.

This was in contrast to the people at the Python conference that described their workplaces as doing primarily Java development. The Java development shops tended to be using Oracle or SQL Server. I admit that the sample size of of the Java developers wasn’t that big (this was a Python conference after all) but my observations are worth keeping in mind since they might be indicating a pattern. Other people have commented about the popularity of PostgreSQL in the Ruby community.

I wonder how much of this observations is because older written in Java are already using SQL Server/Oracle and there hasn’t been a strong enough driver to change to PostgreSQL. While newer software projects are tending to choose Python or Ruby over Java and at the same time picking a FLOSS database such as PostgreSQL where they don’t have to worry about migrating a legacy application.

My talk on writing stored functions in Pl/Python was well received. A lot of people saw appeal in being able to write their stored functions in Python instead of pl/SQL but that shouldn’t be a surprise considering this was a Python conference.

My slides are available here, the video of the talk is posted at pyvideo