Denver Day 1, What’s new in PostgreSQL 9.1

Posted: September 12, 2011 in openstreetmap, postgresql, Presentations
Tags: , , , , ,

Saturday was my first full day in Denver for the OpenStreetMap State Of The Map conference. A few years ago I presented a talk at PGCon on OpenStreetMap. I have now returned the favour and presented a PostgreSQL talk (What’s new in PostgreSQL 9.1) at an OpenStreetMap conference.

The talk itself went well, the talk immediately before mine was on Walking Papers and had standing room only. Many people stayed on for my talk leaving me a room with a good crowd. The audience for this talk was the largest of any talks I’ve presented so far (I’m hoping my PostGIS replication talk I present at FOSS4G later in the week will top that). During the lunch break I spoke with a number of people who seemed excited about unlogged tables and KNN.

A video of the talk is available from FOSSLC here.

You can also download a PDF of my slides

I also want to mention the large number of people who have come up to me since the talk and told me how much they like PostgreSQL and PostGIS and how them and their customers are using PostgreSQL or in the process of moving to it from something like Oracle Spatial. You tend to not meet these people at PostgreSQL specific conferences because for them PostgreSQL is just a tool that solves there problems, and just works.

I will try to post regularly while I’m in Denver this week, many of the posts won’t get picked up by the planet.postgresql.org aggregator so check the blog directly if you want to follow all of my Denver adventures.

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Comments
  1. While your collation example is not technically incorrect, do note that Ljubljana is not in Serbia. đŸ˜‰

    • I am aware Ljubljana is not in Serbia (nor is London) but the Serbian speaker who was helping me with the slides couldn’t think of a city in Serbia that the property that it translated to the same spelling in english as in Serbian but with a different sort order. I didn’t have access to a Slovenia to verify the Slovenian translations so I left it as serbian.

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