Posts Tagged ‘devopsdaysto’

Last week I attended the second Canadian DevOps Days event which was the first to be held in Toronto. DevOps days is a conference dedicated to DevOps. I had a great time and would like to thank the conference organizers and sponsors for making this happen.

DevOps Days was different than most I.T. conferences that I attend because none of the talks were technical in nature. There are lots software products and technologies used in the practice of DevOps such as Puppet, Chef, various CI servers , test frameworks, and logging frameworks but the conference wasn’t really about those. Talks referenced these technologies but that wasn’t the focus of the talks. The key challenges in DevOps today are softer issues. What is How do you go about introducing and promoting DevOps was the key themes of the conference.

One of the most memorable stories from the conference was told during an open-spaces session. The woman telling the story was a manager of a team responsible for some I.T service at a government ministry. She told us how formal initiatives required approvals and budgets that were difficult and time consuming to put in place. Instead of trying to get a “Devops Program” approved or budget to hire “Devops engineers” she took a different approach. Each time one of her reports came to her asking if they could do something such as make a change, fix an issue or propose a solution to a problem she would ask one question.

Will this make us suck less?

If the answer was yes, even if it made them suck just a tiny bit less she often went along with the request. If the answer was no she asked them to rethink the request. This approach allowed her team to make small incremental improvements to the systems they run. Over time their service became much more reliable meaning her team was spending less time fighting fires and had more time to implement bigger improvements within their existing budget. Running a more reliable service also relived some of the pressure on her managers and business partners earning them goodwill. She knew that she couldn’t fix all of the problems with her system in one go and she didn’t sugar coat the reality of their system. The motto wasn’t about being being great, or striving for excellence which would have seemed like a far off goal. The motto was about sucking less something they could archive in the short term while still leaving more room for improvement . The lesson to take away from this story is

Make small incremental improvements that are focused on reducing the pain your co-workers are feeling

Another story from the conference that stood out for me was from Telus. Telus started introducing DevOps practices into various teams a while ago. They started slowly but soon saw dramatic decreases in the number of production issues on products that they had tried DevOps practices on. These success where noticed and helped them roll DevOps practices out to more projects leading to more success. The CEO of Telus (a large Canadian telco) is now giving executive level support and encouragement to the DevOps initiative. The lesson to take away from this story is

Start small but in a position prepared to measure your success. Use those measured success to make a business case for expanding the effort