Posts Tagged ‘slony’

PostgreSQL is becoming a more popular choice for an embedded database because of its BSD license, relatively low memory footprint and great list of features. A few people have asked me if Slony would be a good choice for replication in an embedded environment. Embedded deployments haven’t been a primary use-case for Slony and some of the challenges you would face are worth writing about.

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My talk on PostGIS replication at FOSS4G 2011 went well. It looked like there were about 150 people in the room. Most of them had not yet deployed a PostGIS replication solution.

My talk covered Slony and streaming replication. It gave an overview of different replication patterns that can crop on in the GIS space. I then gave an overview of the key features and limitation of Slony and streaming replication.

A video of the talk is available at FOSSLC

My slides are available here

The slides from my PostgreSQL replication talk at FOSSLC are available here.

The talk covers both Slony and Streaming replication. The key points covered in the talk are

  • Why use replication
  • Some common load balancing architectures
  • 6 Simple steps to setting up Slony
  • 5 Simple steps to setting up streaming replication

I will update this post to link to a video of the talk when FOSSLC makes it available.

Updated: A video of the presentation is available at here

New Features in Slony 2.1

Posted: July 21, 2011 in postgresql
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Last week the Slony team released beta3 of Slony 2.1.0. I thought it would be a good idea to blog about some of the changes we have made in Slony 2.1. My personal theme for this release has been usability. I have overheard people complaining about the usability of Slony and hope that this changes go towards improving it.
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I’m planning on attending two conferences this September in Denver. The first conference is the annual OpenStreetMap State Of The Map‘ September 9-11. This year will mark the first time since I’ve been involved with OpenStreetMap that the main State Of The Map conference has been held in North America. I am looking forward to putting faces to names and meeting lots of awsome mappers. I might be giving a talk on new features in PostgreSQL 9.1 at the conference but they haven’t yet accepted talks or announced the schedule.

Following State Of the Map I will be hanging around in Denver for FOSS4G 2011 (September 12-16). FOSS4G is the annual conference for open source geo-spatial software. I will be giving a talk on ‘PostGIS replication‘ where I will give an overview of built in replication and Slony. My blog post comparing Slony and 9.0 replication is by far the most popular post on this blog, and the talk will expand on that material.

They are expecting about 1000 people to attend FOSS4G this year. I am expecting there to be a lot of maps and talk about maps. In addition to my talk there are many other PostGIS/PostgreSQL talks on the schedule. If your going to be attending a conference related to databases this September what better place to be than Denver? The early registration discounts end on June 30’th so remember to register before the price goes up

My Slony Internals talk at PgEast was well attended at it seemed like most of the room was able to follow along.

Here are the slides from the talk.

Getting ready for PgEast

Posted: March 17, 2011 in postgresql
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Next week I’m giving a talk on Slony Internals at PGEast in NYC. I’ll be covering the different components that many up Slony and explaining how data flows through a Slony cluster. Working on the slides I’m reminded how many moving parts Slony has.

In addition to my talk, Jim Mlodgenski will be giving a talk on multi-master Replication with Slony.

My favourite part of conferences such as PGEast is that I get to put faces to the names & email addresses that I’ve been communicating with. I know that at least two Slony developers and two of the Slony packager maintainers, and a number of regulars from the #slony IRC channel are going to be at PGEast. I’m looking forward to meeting a lot more people in the PostgreSQL community and maybe even learning something about MongoDB.